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NEWS: RSVP to the IMAP public program Dachau 1974: Conservation in Collaboration with the Artist. December 11, 2014 at Fales Library, New York University. MORE RSVP


Disaster Response Information & Assistance for Collections Affected by Hurricane Sandy

Northeast Document Conservation Center 24 hour Disaster Assistance Hotline: (978) 470-1010

American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works Disaster Response & Recovery Hotline: (202) 661-8068 And the website:
http://www.conservation-us.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageId=695

Lyrasis Disaster Assistance:
Phone - (800) 999-8558
Email - disaster@lyrasis.org
Website - Disaster Assistance

Preservation Response & Recovery Resources from Library of Congress:
http://www.loc.gov/preservation/emergprep/recovery.html

National Park Service Conserv-O-Gram Salvage of Water Damaged Collections: Paper, Non-Paper Based, Objects, Natural History, Textiles

Mid-Atlantic Region Archives Conference Disaster Relief Fund:
http://www.marac.info/disaster-relief--

SAA National Disaster Recovery Fund for Archives:
http://www2.archivists.org/news/2008/national-disaster-recovery-fund-for-archives

National Film & Sound Archive Australia Disaster Planning :
http://www.nfsa.gov.au/preservation/handbook/disaster-planning/

Washing and Handling Wet Film (video demonstration):
http://www.folkstreams.net/vafp/clip.php?id=63

Disaster Recovery for Films in Flooded Areas by Mick Newnham

Spec Bros Hurricane and Flood Recovery Info for Video and Audiotape
http://www.specsbros.com/hflood_recover.htm
And Disaster Recovery Checklist:
http://www.specsbros.com/recover.html

NARA Records Emergency Information:
http://www.archives.gov/preservation/records-emergency/

For updates to this list and other resources visit the Metropolitan New York Library Council Disaster Recovery Resource Page or our homepage at avpreserve.com. Our thoughts are with all those who have been affected by the storm.


The IMAP Introduction to Media Preservation Workshop

This workshop is aimed at arts and cultural organizations that are relatively new to the field of moving image preservation and conservation. It provides elementary training to media groups and media-makers interested in saving their collections. In addition to being an excellent opportunity to connect with other groups encountering similar challenges, the workshop also allows members of the independent media communities to interact with professional preservation organizations, bringing the concerns of independents to the field of electronic media preservation. Topics covered include the characteristics of material (audiotape/videotape, digital/optical media, and film), associated risks and their solutions, and strategies for collection management.

While generally a half-day workshop, Introduction to Media Preservation can be expanded to fill an entire day (broken into two sessions). The full-day workshop covers the material in greater depth and includes a demonstration of the IMAP Cataloging Template.

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Workshop Handouts:

The following documents are distributed at the IMAP Introduction to Media Preservation workshop and may also be downloaded as PDFs (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader).

Online Resource List: This document contains a list of useful web sites, preservation guides, assessment tools, and preservation case studies.

Best Practices: This document serves as an overview of current best-practice policies for video preservation, including documentation, inspection, conservation, and migration.

Vendor Questionnaire: One of the most daunting tasks involved in starting a video preservation project can be the selection of a vendor. The following questionnaire was prepared by Chris Lacinak to help you organize the information you will need to select and develop a successful relationship with a vendor.

Budgeting: Although preparing the budget for a videotape preservation project can be daunting, the costs are actually determined by a relatively small number of variables. This document will guide you through those variables.

Basic Condition Report: This document, created for this website by Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP) records basic information about physical condition of a videotape.

 

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Past Workshops:

Digital Preservation for Audio and Digital Preservation for Video

Dates:
June 26: Digital Preservation for Audio
June 27: Digital Preservation for Video
Time: 10 AM – 4 PM

Location:
Atlanta History Center
130 West Paces Ferry Rd NW
Atlanta, GA 30305


DIGITAL PRESERVATION FOR AUDIO (Full day)
Many library and archival collections contain a wide array of audio materials, ranging from early discs to many varieties of audiotape and audiocassettes. All are now faced with the increasing rarity of playback equipment and the expertise needed to maintain it. Moreover, magnetic media is especially prone to physical degradation over time—degradation that can be very difficult to detect until a tape is played back. CDs are also subject to degradation and decay.

Today, the only viable means of long-term audio preservation is digitization—but the process of digitizing audio material can be complicated and requires a series of critical choices. This workshop is aimed at artists, archivists, and librarians who are tasked with the care of audio materials in their collections, with the goal of helping them make good choices for their preservation

DIGITAL PRESERVATION FOR VIDEO (Full day)
If content on analog videotape is to survive for the long term, the tapes must be digitized--moved from the unstable magnetic media on which the content is currently held, into the digital realm where--in theory--they can be preserved indefinitely and migrated forward as files rather than physical objects. Digitization, however, means more than simply selecting a destination file format. It requires a series of decisions that will determine the long-term viability of files created--and thus of the valuable video content.

The full workshop details MORE (PDF)

Making Sense of a Media Collection
May 3, 2013 10am – 5pm
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries
300 S. Hull Street Athens, Georgia 30602 - MORE

This daylong workshop will demystify audiovisual media collections, giving archivists a nuts-and-bolts, practical overview of the issues facing audio and moving image materials.

Presented by:
Independent Media Arts Preservation and The Society Of Georgia Archivists

Archiving the Arts: addressing preservation in the creative process
Saturday, October 13, 2012
9 AM - 5 PM
Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Film Center
36 East 8th Street | between University Place &Greene Street
The Bernie Brillstein Theatre, 1st Floor, Room 101

Harnessing the enthusiasm of members of the Association of Moving Image Archivists Student Chapter at NYU (AMIA @ NYU) and Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP), Archiving the Arts unlocks dialog concerning preventive preservation, the creative process, and where the two concepts intersect. Unlike corporate or policy--based content, independent media art evolves and is often born from fleeting processes, creative approaches, and undocumented methods. Its unique development deserves to be addressed by both its makers and those who fight for its welfare after creation. Our priority is straddling an antiquated divide. Instead of finite responsibilities dictated by title, archivists and artists must learn to work collaboratively in the changing independent media environment. Join us on October 13 as we bridge the gap!

All registration, program, and location information is available at:
www.ArchivingTheArts.blogspot.com

Digital Preservation for Video
Washington, DC
June 8, 2012, 9 AM – 5 PM
George Washington University - MORE

Instructors:
Sarah Stauderman, Collections Care Manager, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Jeff Martin, Executive Director, IMAP

Buffalo, New York
June 15, 2012, 9 AM – 5 PM

Instructor:
Kara Van Malssen, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions

If content on analog videotape is to survive for the long term, the tapes must be digitized--moved from the unstable magnetic media on which the content is currently held, into the digital realm where--in theory--they can be preserved indefinitely and migrated forward as files rather than physical objects. Digitization, however, means more than simply selecting a destination file format. It requires a series of decisions that will determine the long-term viability of files created--and thus of the valuable video content. Workshop topics include: basic digital file creation, preservation and access file formats and codecs, software, storage and trusted digital repositories, workflows for digitization, and technical and preservation metadata. In addition, participants will examine case studies of small and large-scale digitization projects in order to understand real-world applications of principles introduced in the workshop.

Digital Preservation for Videotape (co-sponsored with New England Archivists)Friday March 23, 2012
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Wesleyan University
Middletown, Connecticut - MORE

Instructor: Kara Van Malssen, Independent Media Arts Preservation

Workshop Description: If content on analog videotape is to survive for the long term, the tapes must be digitized - moved from the unstable magnetic media on which the content is currently held, into the digital realm where - in theory - they can be preserved indefinitely and migrated forward as files rather than physical objects. Digitization, however, means more than simply selecting a destination file format. It requires a series of decisions that will determine the long-term viability of files created - and thus of the valuable video content.

Co-Sponsored by:

New England Archivists
Yale University Library Manuscripts and Archives
Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies
Olin Library - Wesleyan University
Watkinson Library - Trinity College
Weissman Preservation Center - Harvard Library

New Curriculum and Workshop on Digital Preservation for Video
December 3, 2010
Franklin Furnace, Brooklyn, NY - MORE

New Curriculum and Workshop on Digital Preservation for Video
Wednesday, November 10, 2010
9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston - MORE

Cosponsored by Aurora Picture Show, Houston Cinema Arts Society, The Menil Collection, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Southwest Alternate Media Project

If content on analog videotape is to survive for the long term, the tapes must be digitized‐‐ moved from the unstable magnetic media on which the content is currently held, into the digital realm where‐‐in theory‐‐they can be preserved indefinitely and migrated forward as files rather than physical objects. Digitization, however, means more than simply selecting a destination file format. It requires a series of decisions that will determine the long‐term viability of files created‐‐and thus of the valuable video content. Workshop topics include: basic digital file creation, preservation and access file formats and codecs, software, storage and trusted digital repositories, workflows for digitization, and technical and preservation metadata. In addition, participants will examine case studies of small and large‐scale digitization projects in order to understand real‐world applications of principles introduced in the workshop.

Modern Mondays with artist John Gerrard
Monday, October 25, 2010
7:00 p.m.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York - MORE

As part of Modern Mondays at MoMA, Irish‐born artist John Gerrard presents his recent work in real‐time 3D. His digital landscapes are recognizable—pig farm, oil derrick, grain silo, and dust storm. Meanwhile the processes and implications are ambiguous. As day passes into night, actions occur, but a particular moment remains frozen in time. His work lies somewhere between documentary and fiction, consisting of images that are constantly developing and regenerating, but seem eternal. The underlying tension comes from Gerrard’s moral discomfort with humankind’s abuse of the environment.

Videotape Preservation Workshop
Friday, October 15, 2010
1 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Film Studies Center, University of Chicago - MORE

When videotape was introduced in 1956, the magnetic recording of a TV signal was a technological marvel. More than five decades (and 60 analog and digital formats) later, videotapes have recorded historic events, served as a means of artistic expression, and become priceless personal documents. Unfortunately, videotape has proven to be an unstable medium, and its recorded images will eventually require careful attention and well-planned action in order to survive. This half-day workshop will serve as an introduction to the issues and strategies necessary to tackle the challenges of videotape preservation. Designed to meet the needs of those with or without technical experience in video production, this workshop is geared to media makers and arts professionals, archivists, conservators, artists and other caretakers of media collections. The workshop will cover videotape's development and evolution, the basics of magnetic recording technology, formats, mitigation of deterioration, risk assessment, handling and inspection, preservation planning, best practices for storage, reformatting, and digitization.

Workshop on Digital Preservation for Video
June 7, 2010 10am-4pm
San Francisco, CA - MORE

Hosted by Bay Area Video Coalition, this new workshop provides participants with strategies and decision-making tools to move unstable magnetic media into the digital realm. Instructor Linda Tadic will cover topics such as basic digital file creation, preservation and access file formats and codecs, software, storage and trusted digital repositories, workflows for digitization, and technical and preservation metadata.

IMAP workshop on Copyright and Digital Project Planning
February 26, 2010
ICP 1144 Ave of Americas, NY, NY

"Long Live the Media ....... Help!"
May 25, 2009
SMAK in Ghent, Belgium
(English translation version)

Introduction To Media Preservation Workshops
ICP-Intro to Media Preservation June 12, 2009 MORE
International Center of Photography January 23, 2009 MORE
PS 1/MOMA, March 4, 2008
The Bronx Museum of the Arts, April 11, 2008
NYU June 16, 2007
BRIC Studio, Brooklyn, NY, June 15, 2007

This workshop served as an introduction to the issues and Strategies needed to tackle the challenges of videotape preservation. Designed to meet the needs of those with or without technical experience in video production, this workshop was geared to media makers and arts professionals, archivists, conservators, artists and other caretakers of media collections.

Instructor: Jeff Martin

A graduate of New York University's MA program in Moving Image Preservation, Jeff Martin has been working with archival moving images for more than a decade, as a television producer, researcher, and archivist. He has taught workshops in media preservation in Chicago under the auspices of Midwest

Media Archives Alliance and developed the content for IMAP's new online preservation resource guide (http://www.eai.org/resourceguide/preservation). He is presently a Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, assessing their media collections.

The IMAP Electronic Media Preservation Symposium was held on September 29, 2007 in Rochester, New York. The IMAP Symposium was a day-long event comprised of an introductory lecture, four panel discussions and an evening screening of preserved videotapes. For complete program: MORE

Transcripts for symposium now available:
Introduction MORE (pdf)
Documentation MORE (pdf)
Conservation 1 MORE (pdf)
Conservation 2 MORE (pdf)
New York Preservation History MORE (pdf)

October 2002 — Seattle, WA IMAP organized an Introduction to Media Preservation workshop to precede the National Alliance for Media Arts and Culture (NAMAC) conference Pull Focus, Pushing Forward: Media Arts Connecting Culture and Community. This full-day workshop, cosponsored by NAMAC and 911 Media Arts Center, provided an in-depth introduction to media preservation, including a demonstration of the IMAP Cataloging Template. Participants included both NAMAC conference attendees and representatives of local media arts organizations.

November 2001 — Portland, OR Organized by IMAP and cosponsored by the Northwest Film Center, this workshop included representatives of arts and cultural organizations, such as KYUK-TV and the National Museum of the American Indian.

October 2001 — Houston, TX This workshop, organized by IMAP and cosponsored by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, included representatives from the Texas Commission on the Arts, the University of Texas, San Antonio, Southwest Alternate Media Project (SWAMP), Cozmoziz, Baylor College, and the Menil Collection.

May 2001 — Dallas, TX Organized by IMAP and cosponsored by the Video Association of Dallas, this workshop included representatives from KERA-TV, LeCroy Center for Educational Telecommunications at Dallas Community College, and Media Projects (a group of independent producers).

November 2000 — Los Angeles, CA Organized by IMAP and co-presented by a representative from Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC), this workshop was cosponsored by and held at Visual Communications in Los Angeles. Among those in attendance were representatives from the National Asian American Telecommunications Association (NAATA), the Japanese American National Museum, and The Jewish Museum (New York).

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Workshop Handouts (2000-2002):

The following documents are distributed at the IMAP Introduction to Media Preservation workshop and may also be downloaded as PDFs (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader).

AV Conservation: This document proposes conservation practices for archival audiovisual materials held in general or primarily paper-based special collections. The sections give an overview of the most frequently encountered audiovisual formats (film, video, magnetic audio, mechanical audio, and optical media), preservation and conservation issues relating to these formats, and recommended conservation practices to assist these materials’ longevity. Written by Linda Tadic.

Media Chart: A succinct chart listing the characteristics of film, video, and optical/digital media, along with their associated problems and potential solutions. Each medium is broken down by most common formats. Some of the problems addressed are sticky shed syndrome, nitrate deterioration, and damage from use. Written by Mona Jimenez.

Internet Resources: From listservs to preservation information to funding sources, this document offers Internet links (and street addresses, when available) for some of the key organizations in magnetic media preservation. In addition to the direct links, a brief synopsis of the focus and strength of each organization’s web site is included.

Vendors: This nationwide list focuses on vendors who are experienced in archival audiovisual material transference. The list is broken down by video, film-to-video transfer, film laboratories, and archival supplies. Specific services or products are noted for each vendor.

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Cataloging Training

Cataloging is only one part of an overall plan to care for and preserve an electronic media collection. IMAP provides three methods of Cataloging Training: workshops, one-on-one or small group sessions, and an online tutorial and quiz.

Workshops

Workshops offer an introduction to both the IMAP Cataloging Template and to media preservation in general. These presentations generally last two days and are most appropriate for representatives of several organizations. (See Introduction to Media Preservation Workshop).

Workshop costs are negotiated by IMAP and the sponsoring organizations. Contact IMAP for more information.

One-on-one or Small Group Training

IMAP also provides one-on-one training in cataloging and in the use of the IMAP Cataloging Template. These are half-day sessions with no more than three people, with appropriate follow-up to ensure that participants understand the principles of cataloging and are fully implementing the IMAP Cataloging Template.

IMAP first made this training available in 1999 when consultant Jim Hubbard provided assistance to The Kitchen, Paper Tiger Television, and Visual Studies Workshop.

Additionally, IMAP may be able to assist you on site with one or more of the following:

  • Installation of the IMAP Template
  • Training staff to use the Template (one to three people per session)
  • Intensive, ongoing technical support on site or via e-mail or telephone
  • Development of an overall preservation plan
  • Consultation on such issues as collection management and storage

Contact us at imap@imappreserve.org for more information about these services.

Online Cataloging Tutorial and Quiz

The third method of Cataloging Training is available through this web site. The IMAP Tutorial introduces and explains each field in the Cataloging Template, and the Quiz indicates how well you have understood and retained the information. The Quick Reference Guide provides easy access to definitions and explanations of the fields, while the Sample Records show examples of completely cataloged items in all layouts of the Template. The Complete Record is hot-linked to the Quick Reference Guide to provide instant explanations of each of the fields. The FAQs offer additional information about cataloging in general and the IMAP Cataloging Template in particular. A Glossary is also available to help familiarize you with common terms associated with cataloging media collections.

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Conferences

On Friday, May 1, 2009
IMAP Preservation Symposium: From Legacy to Frontier
Guggenheim Museum in New York
MORE

Saturday, September 29, 2007
IMAP Electronic Media Preservation Symposium
Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) annual conference
Theater on the Ridge, KODAK
Rochester, New York

Organized by Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP), Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), and the AMIA Independent Media Interest Group, the IMAP Electronic Media Preservation Symposium was a day-long event comprised of an introductory lecture, three panel discussions, and an evening screening of preserved single-channel videotapes. Panels drew on the expertise of a network of professionals involved in the electronic media field and focused on the collection, documentation, preservation, and exhibition of single-channel, installation, and computer-based art. Throughout the Symposium, the documentation and research tools that have been developed by IMAP in the past few years were shared, including the newly launched EAI Online Resource Guide for Exhibiting, Collecting & Preserving Media Art (http://resourceguide.eai.org) and the IMAP Cataloging Template.

The IMAP Electronic Media Preservation Symposium has been made possible by support from the New York State Council on the Arts, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Experimental Television Center.

PROGRAM


On December 3, 2005 IMAP participated in the 2005 AMIA Conference by sponsoring two panels :

Saving Video Art and Performance Documentation from Itself

Hosted by: Independent Media Interest Group/Independent Media Arts Preservation
Chair: Sarah Ziebell - New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
Speakers: Stephen Vitiello - Kinetic Imaging, School of the Arts, Virginia Commonwealth University
Mona Jimenez - MIAP Program, New York University
Jeff Martin - New York University
Heather Weaver - Bay Area Video Coalition

Access to and scholarship about vintage video art, live performance and technology-based installation art depends upon innovative documentation and preservation. Confounding those concerned with ensuring the longevity of media-based artwork are problems of video format diversity and the inimitability of technological instruments favored by many artists. Although seemingly contradictory, these problems often lead to the same end for the performance recording and video art places: inaccessibility. We will address challenges encountered in and strategies for preserving and documenting live performance recordings and video art. Artist Stephen Vitiello will provide insight into the creative and curatorial process. Sarah Ziebell Mann will discuss format obsolescence as it relates to a collection of archival moving image and sound materials documenting the work of internationally renowned intermedia pioneer Robert M. Wilson. Preservation strategies will be addressed by BAVC’s Heather Weaver. Mona Jimenez will discuss her research in documenting and describing instruments, electronic and digital machines, and other technological objects developed by or for artists. Jeff Martin will relate the results of IMAP Video Equipment Registry Feasibility Study. We invite audience members who are interested in or working to preserve interactive media art and technologically-oriented performance art to attend.

Building DAMS and MAMS for Better Access: Customized Management Tools for Museums and Media Archives

Hosted by: Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP)
Chair: Andrew Ingall - The Jewish Museum
Carl Goodman - American Museum of the Moving Image
Seth Kaufman - Whirl-i-gig
Mark Shepard – dotsperinch

External advances in digital technology and institutional initiatives to increase public access to collections have prompted museums and archives to choose custom-designed asset management tools over standardized, off-the-shelf software. Archivists, curators and information architects will address the various stages of the design process: RFP’s; schematic designs; technical specifications; user testing; encoding; and final reviews. Panelists in various stages of media asset management systems development will discuss the benefits and risks of investing in custom-designed media asset management systems. All repositories planning on implementing custom built or turn-key media asset management solutions as well as archivists interested in all aspects of database design, description, and collection management will find this session of interest. Key questions to be discussed include: What criteria should museums and archives use to select an appropriate designer? and How can designers and clients optimize their working relationships?

On June 12, 2005 IMAP co-sponsored a panel discussion with the Electronic Media Interest Group of the AIC at the AIC conference in Minneapolis.

Archiving the Avant Garde: Documenting Downtown New York Performance and Net.art

Three lower Manhattan cultural organizations and repositories will give demonstrations of innovative solutions and databases they have developed to address the unique challenges of documenting downtown and digital art.

Fales Library and Special Collections, New York University
Ann Butler, Archivist, New York University [abstract]

Franklin Furnace Archive
Michael Katchen, Senior Archivist, Franklin Furnace Archive [abstract]

Rhizome.org
Francis Hwang, Director of Technology, Rhizome.org [abstract]

RELATED LINKS: EMG 2005 Presentation Abstracts

June 2004 - Portland Oregon Through generous support from the Rockefeller Foundation, IMAP collaborated with the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works' Electronic Media Group (AIC-f) to underwrite and electronically post presentations from the Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon on June 13-14, 2004.

Electronic Media Group's program, supported by a grant from the National Center for Preservation Technology, addresses progress being made in the many preservation challenges posed by technology-driven cultural materials. Participants presented case studies and other current methods applied for the purpose of extending the life of electronic art, multimedia, audiovisual materials, computer and video games, as well as other interactive works and environments.


Highlights of these presentations include:
  • Results of the use of emulation in the preservation of electronic works in danger of loss due to technology obsolescence
  • Collecting, documenting, and maintaining electronic equipment as cultural artifacts and tools of artists and other innovators
  • Case studies from InterPARES 2, an international research initiative focused on works produced in experiential, dynamic, and interactive environments
  • Development of standards of care in electronic art conservation
  • Use of cutting-edge technology to overcome obstacles in playback of historic audio formats

IMAP was pleased to be able to facilitate and disseminate this innovative research from leading practitioners in the field. All the presentation papers are available here for downloading.


October 28—29, 2002 — Anchorage, AK Voices & Images of Alaska: Sharing the Knowledge, Sharing the Tools, a two-day conference organized by the Alaska Moving Image Preservation Association (AMIPA) and cosponsored by IMAP, was dedicated to preservation strategies for Alaska’s culturally and historically valuable film, video, and audio collections. Discussions and presentations focused on preservation priorities, physical assessment, storage and handling, and cataloging.

May 31—June 1, 2002 — New York, NY Looking Back, Looking Forward, a symposium organized by the Experimental Television Center (ETC) in association with IMAP, Bay Area Video Coalition, and the Electronic Media Specialty Group of the AIC (American Institute for the Conservation of Artistic and Historic Works) with independent consultant Mona Jimenez, addressed issues at the heart of electronic media preservation. Artists, media arts professionals, conservators, and technical experts brought their considerable expertise to the physical preservation of independent electronic media. Participants from throughout the United States and Canada discussed options for quality remastering, as well as hardware and software issues related to preservation. In addition to the working groups, activities included a demonstration of the IMAP Template. For documentation of the symposium and related papers, visit the Experimental Television Center's Video History Project web site or download a PDF version of the transcript (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader). Also available for download are two preservation worksheets created by Sarah Stauderman and distributed at the conference: Risk Assessment and Preservation Priority Worksheet for Videotape Collections .

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Public Programs

IMAP collaborated with the Fales Library at NYU in presenting the "SIGNAL LOSS: SAVING DOWNTOWN VIDEO" panel held at NYU on April 4, 2008

As part of the Symposium "Moving/Images: Preserving Downtown Time-Based Works, this panel's participants were:  Moderator:  Ann Butler, Senior Archivist, Fales Library and Panelists Rebecca Cleman, EAI; video artist Jaime Davidovich, NYU Cinema Studies Professor Chris Straayer, and media preservationist Sarah Ziebell. The transcript for this panel is available HERE.

Preserving the Future: Innovative Strategies for Saving New Media
Wednesday, June 6, 2007
IMAP offered an overview of the current state of the media preservation field. This panel followed the launch of the comprehensive web resource, the EAI Online Resource Guide for Exhibiting, Collecting & Preserving Media Art (http://www.eai.org/resourceguide), for which IMAP created the Preservation section (http://www.eai.org/resourceguide/preservation).
(For complete details download PDF)

On April 29, 2004 the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York, Inc. co-sponsored a program with IMAP, NYU and EAI.

IMAP AND MIAP: Mapping Moving Image Preservation into the Future

Beyond being a collection of acronyms, this month's Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York's meeting will introduce two innovative organizations addressing the challenges of moving image and digital preservation: Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP) and New York University's new Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program (MIAP).

Independent Media Arts Preservation was founded in 1999 by a group of committed media archivists, curators, producers and distributors concerned that professional organizations were not addressing the unique issues and limited resources involved in preserving the work of independent media organizations and artists. Primarily a virtual entity, IMAP collects and provides preservation resources, education and training towards documenting and saving the nation's alternative cultural heritage.

At this meeting, IMAP will launch its newly reconstituted website containing extensive multimedia preservation information, resources and vendor listings, facilitated by presenter Liss Platt. Jim Hubbard will demonstrate IMAP's Cataloging Template and Tutorial, a Filemaker Pro and Access, MARC-compatible cataloging system designed for smaller collections of film, videotape and audio resources.

Mona Jimenez and Howard Besser will talk about New York University’s newly-created Moving Image Archiving and Preservation graduate program.

November 2003 — Vancouver, B.C., Canada In conjunction with Independent Media Interest Group, IMAP organized a special one-day panel discussion and screening entitled Producing, Collecting, and Presenting Moving Images of Indigenous Peoples: A Dialogue for the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) annual conference.

June 2003 — New York IMAP and Electronic Arts Intermix cohosted the New York premiere of Bay Area Video Coalition’s preservation DVD entitled PLAYBACK: Preserving Analog Video. Joanna Goldfarb of BAVC introduced and demonstrated the interactive DVD, which provides an overview of technical practices of video preservation and tracks the complex decision-making process of artists, conservators, and engineers who reconstruct video artwork. This event included the screening of the 2003 restored version of Ant Farm and T. R. Uthco’s The Eternal Frame, which is used as a case study in PLAYBACK: Preserving Analog Video.

November 2002 — Boston IMAP board member Kenneth Schlesinger chaired the panel A Disaster Not Waiting to Happen: Downtown Media Revisits Preservation After September11th at the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) annual conference. The panel was hosted by AMIA’s Independent Media Interest Group.

September 2002 — New York IMAP participated in Media Alliance of New York State’s "Info Fair" held at the National Museum of the American Indian. Jim Hubbard demonstrated the IMAP Cataloging Template at the Fair.

April 2002 — New York TechArchaeology Reformatted Organized by IMAP Director Dara Meyers-Kingsley and sponsored by IMAP, ArtTable Inc., and The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC), this forum followed up on the findings of TechArchaeology: A Symposium on Installation Art Preservation (January 2000 — San Francisco), which reviewed the development of conservation practices for technology-based installation art. Panelists included Dara Birnbaum, artist; Christopher Eamon, curator; Mona Jimenez, artist and media arts consultant; and Barbara London, Associate Curator, Video, MOMA. Paul Messier, Conservator of Photographs and Works on Paper, Boston Art Conservation, moderated the discussion. Some of the key issues addressed included concepts of what constitutes the "core" of an artwork; what can be modified in an installation without compromising its integrity; questions around documentation to ensure accurate re-stagings; and the role of the artists in ensuring the faithful exhibition of their work in the future.

January—February 2002 Independent Media Arts Preservation Salon, an online salon hosted by NAMAC and moderated by IMAP representatives Jim Hubbard and Mona Jimenez, featured weekly online panel discussions of topics such as collection management strategies, reformatting issues, and more. The panel included representatives from Experimental Television Center, International Center for 8mm Film, The Kitchen, and Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC).

November 2001 — New York, NY IMAP organized a panel discussion in conjunction with The Mix–New York Experimental Gay and Lesbian Film and Video Festival focusing on preservation for film and video artists.

November 2001 — Portland, OR Mona Jimenez, representing IMAP, chaired the conference panel Democracy in Action: Works from Community Media Centers at the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) conference. At the same conference, Jim Hubbard, also representing IMAP, participated in the panel on the Moving Image Gateway Project.

October 2001 — Houston, TX IMAP was among the presenters at the Texas Media Arts Conference sponsored by Southwest Alternate Media Project (SWAMP). The IMAP Preservation Roundtable provided basic information on electronic media preservation.

March 2001 — New York, NY Mona Jimenez represented IMAP as a panelist and respondent at Preserving the Immaterial: A Conference on Variable Media at the Guggenheim Museum.

January 2001 — New York, NY Ann Butler organized and moderated an IMAP-sponsored program hosted by the Guggenheim Museum. Presenter Jon Ippolito from the Guggenheim discussed the "variable media initiative" as well as the upcoming conference Preserving the Immaterial. Jim Lindner of Vidipax presented his "Medialess Archive" concept.

November 2000 — Los Angeles, CA IMAP was one of the organizers for the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) annual conference Beyond Hollywood: Preserving Independent Media for the 21st Century.

October 2000 — Minneapolis, MN IMAP hosted a Preservation Roundtable during the National Alliance for Media Arts and Culture (NAMAC) conference Changing Media/Mediating Change.

January 1999 — New York, NY Dara Meyers-Kingsley, independent curator and current Director of IMAP, co-organized a roundtable discussion with ArtTable entitled Buying Time: Collecting Video. The event focused on issues that arise when selling, collecting, and preserving video and installation art. Presenters included artists, collectors, distributors, gallery owners, and curators. Download a PDF version of the ArtTable transcript (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader).

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